Jul 07 2015

Responsibility of the Electorate

When we vote in elections, we have a responsibility to vote well, based on good knowledge of the choices available to us. The word “FIDUCIARY” describes a state of legal or ethical trust between people or groups of people. We consider that our elected representatives have a fiduciary responsibility to fulfill our expectations that they …

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Jul 04 2015

Human Rights and Revolutions

Revolutions involve a rejection of government and usually, some form of overthrowing an existing government and establishing a new one. Most revolutions are fueled by the idea that an existing governing force has exceeded appropriate limits to it’s power and has encroached upon human rights. A factor that was mostly unique to the American Revolution …

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Jul 03 2015

Lincoln, Racism, Confederate Symbols

There has been much recent discussion about banning symbols that are connected to slavery and racism through the Confederate States of America. There is no discussion of applying the same standards to other symbols and groups and people. In the fourth Lincoln-Douglas debate in Charleston, IL, on September 18, 1858, Abraham Lincoln said, “I will …

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Jul 03 2015

The Corwin Amendment – 1861

We have been told that the US Civil War was fought over slavery. We have been told that President Abraham Lincoln provided the moral strength necessary to preserve the Union and abolish slavery. There are other viewpoints that the South fought for economic reasons and for the right to leave a group of states that …

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Jul 03 2015

Prelude to US Civil War – Timeline

Here are some key events from the timeline of the US Civil War: 1857 – US Supreme Court decision in “Dred Scott v. Sanford” excluded blacks from citizenship and permitted slavery in all new territories, declaring the 1820 Missouri Compromise as unconstitutional 1858 – Lincoln – Douglas debates 1859 – Oct 16 – John Brown …

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Jun 14 2015

A Congressional Aristocracy

The American Congress is composed of two houses: the Senate and the House of Representatives. Patterned loosely after the British House of Lords and House of Commons, they are designed to offer representation to two different levels of social strata. They also offer several forms of checks and balances designed to prevent pockets of power …

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Jun 10 2015

How Aristocracy Fails

An aristocracy is a form of government designed on the principle that the members of a society who are most capable of ruling well, should be the rulers. They are typically the top percentage of a society in terms of education, wealth, social connections and power outside of government. In Greek, “aristos” means “excellent” and …

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May 24 2015

Core Principles in Foreign Policy

With a constant shifting of political winds at home, it becomes difficult to maintain a consistent stance on foreign policy. Foreign aid and military support become easy targets when budget stress comes to the forefront. Withdrawal into isolation makes no sense, but neither does giving support that enables problems to continue. We should declare a …

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May 01 2015

A Healthy Fear of Tyranny

The United States of America was founded by men who feared tyranny because they had experienced it. In most cases, either their direct ancestors or they themselves had come to America to escape some form of tyranny in the old world. Then, they found themselves dealing with a remote government that did not understand them …

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Apr 28 2015

The Code of Hammurabi

Hammurabi was a king who ruled the Babylonian empire almost four thousand years ago (-1800). As he conquered neighboring areas, he grew aware of the need to create a standardized code of laws for all the people, since each city-state had it’s own unique laws that often conflicted with each other. He engaged in an …

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