Category Archive: History

Apr 28 2015

The Code of Hammurabi

Hammurabi was a king who ruled the Babylonian empire almost four thousand years ago (-1800). As he conquered neighboring areas, he grew aware of the need to create a standardized code of laws for all the people, since each city-state had it’s own unique laws that often conflicted with each other. He engaged in an …

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Apr 02 2015

Virginia Declaration of Rights – 1776

In 1776, the fifth Virginia Convention unanimously adopted the Virginia Declaration of Rights, followed shortly by a separate document, the Constitution of Virginia. George Mason is given primary credit for drafting the document, while James Madison, Patrick Henry and Edmund Pendleton also proposed input. Thomas Jefferson likely was influenced by it when he drafted the …

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Mar 30 2015

Law of the Twelve Tables – 449 BC

When we speak of “Rome” we often use the term as a broad brush, painting across a thousand years of history or more, that includes the rise and fall of a great empire. Before the empire, there was a republic, and before the republic, there were kings. In 509 BC, the last Etruscan king was …

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Jan 27 2015

Laws of Reform by Solon

Solon was a Greek poet, writer and lawmaker who lived in Athens around 600 BC. Because of his reputation for fairness and wisdom, he was given authority to re-write the constitution and laws of Athens. Many of his reformed laws inspired similar laws later in the Roman Empire and some of his basic concepts still …

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May 14 2014

Act of Abjuration (1581)

In 1581, the States General of the Netherlands decided to dissolve their allegiance to the Hapsburg King, Phillip II of Spain. The “Act of Abjuration” was their declaration of independence. It is known as the “Plakkaat” in Dutch. The States General is a legislative body composed of two parts: a Senate and a House of …

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Feb 26 2014

The Cyrus Cylinder – 530 BC

The first Persian empire was founded around 550 BC by Cyrus the Great. Cyrus distinguished himself not only as a soldier and king of an empire, but also as a statesman and for his wisdom. He conquered the nearby empires of Babylon, Lydia and Medes, uniting the Middle East into the Persian Empire. He treated …

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Sep 03 2013

Fascism is Now Known as Liberalism

Both terms, “fascist” and “liberal” have gone through a morphing process over the years. “Liberal” used to mean, standing for liberty, and was associated with John Locke’s ideas of natural rights that preclude any form of government. The American Revolution was based on these ideas and was considered to be a liberal event because it …

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Aug 22 2013

Code of Justinian

Justinian was emperor of the Byzantine Empire (or East Roman Empire) from 527 to 565. His full name in latin was Flavius Petrus Sabbatius Justinianus Augustus. Justinian assigned his Minister of Justice, Tribonian to the task of rewriting older Roman law with an objective of updating it, clarifying it, and standardizing it. This work became …

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May 22 2013

Magna Carta – 1215

The Magna Carta, or “Great Charter” was a peace treaty signed by King John of England in 1215, that guaranteed his barons that he would respect the nation’s laws and the rights and privileges they expected and the freedom of the church. This charter ended a rebellion by the barons that had been caused by …

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Jul 30 2012

King Andrew and the Bank

http://www.neh.gov/humanities/2008/januaryfebruary/feature/king-andrew-and-the-bank On July l0, 1832, President Andrew Jackson sent a message to the United States Senate. He returned unsigned, with his objections, a bill that extended the charter of the Second Bank of the United States, due to expire in 1836, for another fifteen years. As Jackson drily noted, the bill was presented to him …

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