«

»

Jul 03 2015

Lincoln, Racism, Confederate Symbols

There has been much recent discussion about banning symbols that are connected to slavery and racism through the Confederate States of America. There is no discussion of applying the same standards to other symbols and groups and people.

In the fourth Lincoln-Douglas debate in Charleston, IL, on September 18, 1858, Abraham Lincoln said,

“I will say then that I am not, nor ever have been, in favor of bringing about in any way the social and political equality of the white and black races, [applause]-that I am not nor ever have been in favor of making voters or jurors of negroes, nor of qualifying them to hold office, nor to intermarry with white people; and I will say in addition to this that there is a physical difference between the white and black races which I believe will forever forbid the two races living together on terms of social and political equality. And inasmuch as they cannot so live, while they do remain together there must be the position of superior and inferior, and I as much as any other man am in favor of having the superior position assigned to the white race. I say upon this occasion I do not perceive that because the white man is to have the superior position the negro should be denied every thing. I do not understand that because I do not want a negro woman for a slave I must necessarily want her for a wife. [Cheers and laughter.] My understanding is that I can just let her alone. I am now in my fiftieth year, and I certainly never have had a black woman for either a slave or a wife. So it seems to me quite possible for us to get along without making either slaves or wives of negroes. I will add to this that I have never seen, to my knowledge, a man, woman or child who was in favor of producing a perfect equality, social and political, between negroes and white men.”

http://www.nps.gov/liho/learn/historyculture/debate4.htm

Should we then begin by tearing down the Lincoln Memorial?